Daniel S. Williams
Estate Planning Newsletter
Beneficiaries -- Types of Professional Advisers
 
Receiving an inheritance calls for two basic activities that should be discussed and handled with an attorney: reviewing the estate closing to insure that the decedent's wishes were carried out and preparing a beneficiary's own will or living trust so that his new assets will be protected. If a beneficiary already uses an attorney for general personal and business advice, he should find out if she is familiar with estate planning. If not, the attorney should be asked for a reference.More...
 
Revocation of Healthcare Directives and Alternatives
 
If you execute a healthcare power of attorney document and a living will, you can revoke or cancel them at any time. Most states do not require you to revoke the documents in writing. Be aware that if you have told your healthcare provider about your documents, many states require that you inform the healthcare provider of the revocation. More...
 
Executors -- Paying Creditors
 
Within one to three months (depending on the particular state) after the executor has been appointed, he is required by law to file a "complete" inventory of the estate's assets. The inventory is submitted to the court and, like all other papers submitted to the court, becomes a matter of "public record" (available to anyone who wants to look at it). Briefly, there are two reasons for the filing of the inventory. First, to indicate to the court the items of property for which the executor will later "account" to the court (tell the court in detail what he did with all these items when the estate is settled), and to let the beneficiaries, creditors, and all other interested parties know just what is included in the deceased's probate estate. If the executor delays or refuses to file an inventory, any interested party may ask the court to order him to file one, although if there are no disputes or contests, executors often file their inventories late.More...
 
Trust Elements - Trust Property - II
 
A trust has five main elements. First, a settlor transfers some or all of his or her property. Second, the property transferred by the settlor is designated trust property. Third, the trust property designated by the settlor is transferred with the settlor's intent that it be managed by another. Fourth, the trust property designated by the settlor is transferred for management by a trustee. Fifth, the trust property designated by the settlor is managed by a trustee for the benefit of a beneficiary.More...
 
Trust Elements - A Settlor With Intent
 
A trust has five main elements. First, a settlor transfers some or all of his or her property. Second, the property transferred by the settlor is designated trust property. Third, the trust property designated by the settlor is transferred with the settlor's intent that it be managed by another. Fourth, the trust property designated by the settlor is transferred for management by a trustee. Fifth, the trust property designated by the settlor is managed by a trustee for the benefit of a beneficiary. More...
 
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